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Memoirs of the Mother and Wife of Washington Margaret Cockburn Conkling

Memoirs of the Mother and Wife of Washington

Margaret Cockburn Conkling

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258 pages
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 About the Book 

This book was published in 1851.Excerpts:Mrs. Mary Washington was born towards the con-clusion of the year 1706. Little is known of her an-cestors, except that she inherited an unimpeachablename. We are informed that she was descended fromaMoreThis book was published in 1851.Excerpts:Mrs. Mary Washington was born towards the con-clusion of the year 1706. Little is known of her an-cestors, except that she inherited an unimpeachablename. We are informed that she was descended froma highly respectable family of English colonists, namedBall, who originally established themselves on thebanks of the Potomac.It is to be lamented that no records of the youth, orearly womanhood of this illustrious lady have beenpreserved............................................................................................Gifted with great firmness and constancy of purpose,as well as with a clear judgement, and remarkable men-tal independence, her self-reliance was rapidly strength-ened, and soon rendered habitual by circumstances sopeculiarly demanding its exercise, as those in whichduty imperatively summoned her to act.Her thorough knowledge of practical life enabledMrs. Washington to superintend all matters relating tothe affairs of her household, and, in a good degree, tosupply, by her own indefatigable industry and ingenu-ity, whatever was necessary to the welfare and comfortof her family. Order, regularity and occupationreigned supreme in her little world of home..............................................................................................In addition to the dear and interesting companionswho were added permanently to the members of herhousehold, Mrs. Washington continued, as she hadhitherto done, when at Mount Vernon during thewarmer months of the year, to gather around her thoseother family friends and connections who had longpartaken her hospitality. Sorrow had never the effectto render her selfish - nor did she now forget what wasdue in this respect to her husband, as well as to herown personal obligations and attachments. But shewas, of course, altogether disinclined to participate inthe public rejoicings and festivities in which the Re-publican Commander-in-Chief, was compelled by hispublic station to take part.